Grand Trunk Heritage in New England

$ 11.95

Few outside of New England are aware that the Canadian National subsidiary Grand Trunk had extensive operations throughout Maine and northern Vermont. The Grand Trunk main line from Portland, Maine, through Island Pond, Vermont, to Monreal, Quebec, was a conveyor for international trade between these two important Eastern ports. Portland was an important connection for Montreal, especially when the St. Lawrence River was frozen for the winter, seasonal traffic of wheat and produce were the line's mainstay for many years.

From steam to diesel, legendary photographer Phillip R. Hastings was there to capture it all on film. At the turn of the century, the Grand Trunk was handing over all of its lucrative traffic to the Canadian Pacific at North Bay. Investors were convinced to back the Grand Trunk Pacific, a line that would run the length of Canada and terminate at Prince Rupert, British Columbia. The last section of railroad was completed between Winnipeg and Prince Rupert in 1914, but the company had already fallen on hard times.

By 1919, the Grand Trunk Pacific was a ward of the Canadian government, with many of the eastern lines absorbed by the Canadian National Railway, with the Grand Trunk Western emerging to operate lines in Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. The Grand Trunk name persisted in New England for a few years longer, standing out from CN's other eastern subsidiary, the Central Vermont.

Grand Trunk Heritage documents the waning years of the steam era on this interesting New England main line, from heavy freights and long passenger trains, to busy locals and switching yards. This updated and expanded edition includes a number of photos from the diesel era, into the 1980s. Enjoy 64 pages of wonderful black and white photography from Phillip Hastings, A.L. Thomas, and others. Fans of the late steam era in northern New England will not want to miss Grand Trunk Heritage.